Prelude in G major by Felix Mendelssohn, played by Brent te Velde

Although Mendelssohn’s organ sonatas have come to be favored in performance, Mendelssohn’s first publication for organ was a collection of three preludes and fugues (op. 37), published at the turn of the year 1837/1838. Mendelssohn (1809-1847) had at first intended…

Prelude in G major by Felix Mendelssohn, played by Brent te Velde

Source

0
(0)

Although Mendelssohn’s organ sonatas have come to be favored in performance, Mendelssohn’s first publication for organ was a collection of three preludes and fugues (op. 37), published at the turn of the year 1837/1838. Mendelssohn (1809-1847) had at first intended only to publish three stand-alone fugues, but upon receiving the manuscript, his Leipzig publisher, Breitkopf and Härtel, requested that he also compose three preludes in order to respect the traditional pairing established by J.S. Bach. Mendelssohn received this request just after his wedding to Cécile Jeanrenaud, and composed the three preludes over five days of his honeymoon. Of his organ works, these preludes and fugues show most directly Mendelssohn’s study and assimilation of the music of Bach, and, like Bach, Mendelssohn shows his ability to use counterpoint and formal structure to create music of compelling character and interest. The prelude in G major is defined by a gentle, pastoral character, and moves gracefully from G major through the keys of D major and B-flat major before resting at its midpoint in the darker key of C minor. Mendelssohn quickly and effortlessly returns to G major to prepare a return of the opening material, this time masterfully transformed to rest in the home key of G major with a short codetta.

0 / 5. 0